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Upcoming Webinar: “Pediatric Aquatic Therapy: Improving Outcomes by Integrating Play & Creativity”

2015 March 5

LegUpFarmCropLeg Up Farm is a non-profit therapy center in York County, Pennsylvania, for children with disabilities and developmental delays. They have seen some great results from using aquatic therapy along with some creativity with their pediatric clients.

Join us on March 12, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT for the free webinar, “Pediatric Aquatic Therapy: Improving Outcomes by Integrating Play & Creativity.” Amy Arruda, DPT, ATRIC, Director of Aquatics at Leg Up Farm in York County, PA as she shares how aquatic therapy can be used effectively for pediatric physical therapy. She will review the benefits of water for this patient population and will share specific protocols that they use. Amy will also present cases seen at Leg Up Farm in which they’ve successfully used aquatic therapy to increase progress.

Attendees will learn:

  • Creative and fun ways to use the pool for the pediatric population
  • Specific aquatic protocols and techniques
  • How to customize programs tailored to individual needs of children
  • About the unique and innovative programs at Leg Up Farm

Learn more and register here>>


Register Today



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Interested in Creating a Senior Aquatics Program? Access this webinar on-demand

2015 March 3
by hydroworx

IMG_6040rachelwebinarOn February 24, 2015, we hosted a webinar titled, “Road Map to Creating a Successful Aquatics Program for Seniors.” In this webinar, Rachel McDermott, PTA, former Director of Rehabilitation and Paula Osterberger, Wellness Director at Stonehill Care Center in Dubuque, IA discussed their successes and lessons learned from starting an aquatic therapy program in their senior living wellness and therapy center.

Stonehill Care Center is a fully accredited not-for-profit residential and long-term facility, which is a part of Stonehill Franciscan Services in Dubuque, IA. The CCRC underwent a major expansion in 2013 which included therapy and wellness centers, as well as the installation of a high-tech aquatic therapy pool.

In the webinar, Rachel reviewed some of the benefits that they focused on when gaining support from all parties for putting a highly functional therapy pool into the new facility:

  • Increasing RUG scores by moving patients from very high to ultra high
  • Increasing therapy minutes
  • Providing functional therapy for those which were max assist
  • Piggybacking OT in the therapy pool to increase ADL minutes
  • Returning patients back to their homes more quickly

She also discussed the statistics and great results that they saw after the therapy pool was installed, including becoming the provider of choice in town. The results were even more drastic than they could have anticipated. They began an outpatient program to be able to accommodate the many referrals they were getting for pre- and post-op joint replacements.

Rachel provided many wonderful details during the webinar including some revenue statistics, such as bringing in $300,000 in additional revenue in the first 5 months thanks to the therapy pool. They are continually coming up with new ways to fill the pool all day long. She had great ideas for some additional ways to earn revenue from the pool, if needed:

  • Opening the pool for the community to use during off-hours
  • Renting the pool to outside facilities who can benefit from the pool
  • Renting the pool for community athletes and teams
  • Partnering with other local assistive, independent living facilities to use the pool for skilled services needed in return
  • Teaming up with large businesses for wellness programs
  • Creating your own wellness program for staff

Typically, not everyone is on-board when you start looking into adding an aquatic therapy pool, but there are some ways to convince them (including therapy staff) how beneficial it can be. Rachel provides many techniques for warming staff up to the idea.

Paula also discusses how the wellness program integrates with the therapy program. Their wellness program has a focus on changing the perception of aging. She offers some great marketing tips on how to get the community excited about a new therapy pool.

Watch the webinar on-demand to find out how the team at Stonehill created a successful aquatics program>>


View Webinar On Demand

Stonehill Franciscan Services (SFS) is a faith-based, not-for-profit 501(c)(3) quality retirement and care community serving older adults in and around Dubuque, Iowa. In 1978, the new state-of-the-art 250-bed Stonehill Care Center was opened. In 1999, Assisi Village was constructed adding Independent Living to the campus, and in 2009, skilled-nursing and therapy began. In 2013, a major expansion was completed adding four households including a Memory Care Center as well as world-class Therapy and Wellness Centers. Current services provided by the continuing care retirement community (CCRC) include: a Wellness Center; Independent Living Villas and Apartments; Assisted Living Apartments; a Residential Care Facility; a Long-Term Care Facility; a Skilled Nursing Facility; an In-Patient and Out-Patient Rehabilitation Program with Physical, Occupational, Speech and Massage Therapy. 

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Oregon Duck Tight End is Redefining What is Possible

2015 March 2

The following blog post has been summarized from the recent NBC Sport article, “Duck TE Pharaoh Brown nearly had lower leg amputated,” published on February 25, 2015.

Many articles have recently been written about the inspiring comeback story of Oregon Duck, TE Pharaoh Brown. Brown’s injury occurred this past November in a game against Utah, which the Ducks won by 24 points. The severity of the injury combined with his progress has garnered national attention.WEB20130208_SM_TrainingFacility_004

The athlete suffered a major leg injury, which kept him hospitalized in Utah for a week. This injury did not occur in, what some might call, a typical way. An earlier NBC sport article summarized the injury in this way, “Brown fired out up field when his left foot landed on the right foot of tight end Evan Baylis (teammate), lined up inside to Brown’s left. Brown stumbled a bit after stepping on Baylis’ foot and then extended his right leg to regain his balance. But he planted the right foot awkwardly, resulting in his weight moving forward and over the leg, causing it to buckle at the knee.”

The TE underwent three surgeries on his leg and nearly faced amputation. Shockingly, Brown never sustained any broken bones, rather, “what left him in the ICU of the University of Utah Hospital, was a stretched artery in his leg that caused internal bleeding and cut off blood flow below his right shin.”

Brown’s injury consisted of a pair of torn ligaments as well arterial damage. 

Following the injury, Brown told The Oregonian [newspaper]  that, “He expected to join his teammates back in Eugene, OR the following day, believing the diagnosis was limited to ligament damage. In the early morning hours, a doctor burst into his hospital room — Brown remembers his message being so urgent that the doctor didn’t even introduce himself — to brief the tight end on the artery’s precarious condition. If not corrected soon, amputation was likely, he said he was told. Brown called an Oregon medical staffer to share the news and the recommendation came quickly: Get surgery.

“That just shocked me,” Brown said. “Once he said I wasn’t going to be able to walk or run again I was like, all right.”

Believe it or not, Brown’s recovery has been going really well. Despite the scope of the injury, Brown has been actively recovering on stationary bikes and jogging on the underwater treadmill. There is no definitive time frame for his return to the field, but Brown is doing everything he can to get back to 100% in order to join his teammates back on the turf. 

We wish the Oregon Tight End the best of luck in his recovery. His story is truly inspiring. From one day being told he could face amputation and not be able to walk again to riding a bike and jogging in the pool on an underwater treadmill just a few short months later, is nothing short of extraordinary.

Read the full story today>>

 

Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

Join us on March 19, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT as Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at The University of Kansas, presents the webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” This webinar will provide treatment ideas for using the benefits of hydrotherapy for low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis. The webinar will also offer strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium.

Register Today>>

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Spring Training: ATs Discuss the Role of Hydrotherapy

2015 February 27

Here in South-central Pennsylvania, snow covers the corn fields and roof-tops. Temperatures continue to dip below freezing.  Spring has not yet sprung.

Yet, a few thousand miles south of here, the smell of freshly cut grass wafts through the air. Infields are raked and chalked to perfection and athletes prepare to don their spikes. Scores of little towns dotting central Florida and Arizona welcome their teams “home” for the town’s most electrifying two months of the year:  baseball’s Spring Training.

Spring Training has been a baseball ritual for nearly 130 years, almost as old as baseball itself. It gives new players an opportunity to compete for a coveted spot on the team’s roster and lets established players hone their skills before the season opener. For these athletes, Spring Training is all about performance.

A quick look around the league reveals how team athletic trainers are using HydroWorx products to enhance the Spring Training performance of Major League Baseball players.

Cincinnati Reds HydroWorx pool

Cincinnati Reds HydroWorx pool

Herm Schneider, Chicago White Sox

Schneider, legendary head athletic trainer for the Chicago White Sox, explains how his team utilizes aquatic therapy.

“We use our HydroWorx underwater treadmills about everyday, especially in our Spring Training home.  For our older players, we’re trying to reduce the impact on their lower bodies, back, knees and/or ankles. We get them in the pool for low-impact cardio training.”

“For the younger guys,” continues Schneider, 36-year veteran with the Sox, who has for many years boasted MLB’s lowest injury rate, “the underwater treadmill becomes a bridge from rehab to land work. After injuries, we get the athletes running in water first before we take them back out to their land workouts.  It’s a wonderful tool to have.”

Patrick Serbus, Cincinnati Reds

“In my opinion,” stated Patrick Serbus, Assistant Medical Coordinator for the Cincinnati Reds, “the best use for this modality is early return to function.  For guys who are in a non-weight bearing or partial weight bearing restriction for extended periods of time, the underwater treadmill is extremely useful. We get guys moving by using a buoyancy suit, or by lowering the treadmill deck, unloading up to 90% of their body weight.”

“Whether it’s a significant ankle injury, stress fracture or knee surgery, we get guys in as soon as their sutures and portals are closed up; get them moving as quickly as possible. It makes a huge difference.”

Ryan Bitzel, San Diego Padres

Ryan Bitzel, PT, rehab coordinator for the San Diego Padres, finds many uses for his HydroWorx therapy pool—including shoulder injuries—in the Padres’ newly revamped facility in Peoria, Arizona.

“The natural resistance that water provides has been very effective in getting our athletes started on their shoulder strengthening exercises at an earlier timeframe. During the early stages of rehab, we put them in the water and start with a couple of basic shoulder cuff strengthening exercises. Making figure eights and external rotation exercises in the water while standing promotes earlier strengthening through full range of motion for our athletes. Also, simply walking on the underwater treadmill helps the muscles to relax.”

Ryan also uses the variable-speed resistance jets to treat shoulders. “I can give them a little bit of resistance by turning on the jets and controlling the amount of water flowing from the jets.  We start them off light, then progressively get a little bit stronger, and give them something to kind of ‘push through.’”

Jimmy Southard, Seattle Mariners

Jimmy Southard, Head AT Coordinator for the Seattle Mariners explains that last year he treated an athlete who’d undergone micro-fracture surgery on his knee.

“We were able to get him moving on parts that were weight bearing a lot earlier than we would have without the underwater treadmill,” explained Southard.  “And it’s the same with ankle injuries and hamstrings.  Because of water’s buoyancy, our rehabbing athletes can still get a really solid cardiovascular workout without putting strain on the joint.”

 

We’re excited for opening day and look forward to watching all of our baseball customers throughout the season. Until then, may they stay healthy and injury-free!

 

Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

On March 19, 2015 from 1-2pm EDT, Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at University of Kansas, will present the webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” This webinar will provide treatment ideas for using the benefits of hydrotherapy for low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis, and Spondylolisthesis. The webinar will also offer Strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium.

Register Today>>

 

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Ellsworth, Maine boasts new Senior Living Community

2015 February 26

The following blog post has been summarized from the recent press release, “Innovation in Ellsworth,” published on February 26, 2015.

Seaport Village, located in Ellsworth, ME, is a brand new, 63,600-square-foot, two-story facility that holds 91 beds — 61 for nursing care, including rehabilitation services, and the other 30 for assisted living.IMG_6040rachelwebinar

The project had been in the works for a long time as the city has had a long-standing goal of providing more services to their seniors. Ellsworth’s city manager, Michelle Beal, shares that, “Through collaboration with First Atlantic and a focused and creative development team, we’ve brought something to Ellsworth that is truly special.”

First Atlantic Healthcare, operates 16 senior living communities throughout Maine, was looking to upgrade their position in Ellsworth, a market they’d entered two decades earlier by purchasing Collier’s Rehab and Nursing Center. The location they purchased was initially somewhat of a challenge. The property was next to an empty elementary school, which underwent a major renovation to become the beautiful multi-functional community center.

“Seaport Village offers the very best in high-quality senior living and senior care—including a high tech therapy pool with underwater treadmill.  We’re so excited to be able to offer such advanced care in our rural community. It’s fabulous for our people and adds value to our city,” added Beal.

The press release also features a short interview with Rebecca LaBrie, Program Director, OTR/L, with Rehabcare, Seaport Village’s contracted rehab provider. LaBrie enthusiastically shares how the newly installed state-of-the-art therapy pool has quickly become a  hit. On the day of the open house, LaBrie had blisters from pushing the buttons so many times to demonstrate the therapy pool’s features.

The new community is nothing short of comforting, enjoyable and functional. First Atlantic truly made a point to make the environment feel more like a home than a hospital. The interior is very open and filled with areas created for socializing and relaxing.

In addition to the benefits this facility will provide for its residents, the city itself will certainly benefit too. Craig G. Coffin, First Atlantic COO, affirmed, “Developing this facility with the help of the City of Ellsworth was a gratifying process. We are truly excited about the future of healthcare in Ellsworth and the partnerships we have created. When you work together to provide the best possible care, great things happen.”

We are certainly excited for what is in store for Seaport Village as well as the City of Ellsworth, and we couldn’t be happier to be featured in this beautiful location.

Read the full story today>>

Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

Join us on March 19, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT as Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at The University of Kansas, presents the webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” This webinar will provide treatment ideas for using the benefits of hydrotherapy for low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis. The webinar will also offer strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium.

Register Today>>

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