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HydroWorx Was a “Clear Choice” for This World-Class Senior Living Facility

2015 March 16

When Clear Choice says its goal is to foster independence, freedom, mobility and healthy living in its residents, the company is being sincere. Not only are they known for their cutting-edge methods for helping their patients remain in tiptop shape, but they also offer tremendous resources. Currently, Clear Choice has multiple facilities across Florida and the rest of the country.

Recently, we visited with Clear Choice’s Spring Lake Rehabilitation Center in Winter Haven, Florida, home to two HydroWorx 500 Series pools, to understand how they are using their therapy pools. What we learned from Speech Language Pathologist Emily Perez and PTA Robin Rose of Clear Choice’s Spring Lake was exciting, so we want to share a few of the ways they use their hydrotherapy pool!

  • Both Emily and Robin find that the underwater treadmill is especially beneficial to the geriatric population suffering from low and upper extremity edema, arthritis (and similar conditions), compromised circulatory system, joint problems, general weakness and gait issues.
  • The treadmill has proven to be an excellent way to help patients with everyday life skills, such as being able to get in and out of a chair, walk without putting undue pressure on one side and much more.
  • For residents and clients who cannot safely conduct land-based physical therapy or exercise, the water provides an excellent means for stretching, squatting, walking, balancing and strength-building.
  • Speech therapy can even be completed in the water by using the water to blow bubbles, which uses a variety of mouth muscles!
  • By utilizing peripheral objects in the water, such as kickboards, patients are able to expand what they do when they are in the HydroWorx pool. When resistance jets are added, a new dimension of fitness can be reached.  (Plus, those jets are beloved as a soothing end-of-session massage.)

As Emily says with pride:  “This is the best equipment on the market… We use all aspects of it, every day.”

Take a look at some photos of Spring Lake Rehabilitation’s hydrotherapy room:

Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

Join us on March 19, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT as Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at The University of Kansas, presents the webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” This webinar will provide treatment ideas for using the benefits of hydrotherapy for low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis. The webinar will also offer strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium.

Register Today>>

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Presbyterian Village North: Where Water Nurtures Healthier Aging

2015 March 13

Every senior living community strives to cater to its population in a variety of ways.  This includes offering rehabilitation and fitness options that aren’t available elsewhere.  After all, chances are good that as residents age, they will need some kind of physical or occupational therapy, as well as the desire to stay in shape.

HydroWorx 3500 at Presbyterian Village North

HydroWorx 3500 at Presbyterian Village North

Statistics support these realities of getting older:

  • 20-30 percent of seniors ages 65+ suffer from moderate to severe injuries as a result of falls, and recovering from those injuries will generally require physical therapy.
  • Knee and hip replacements are expected to rise anywhere from 174 to 673 percent in the next two decades thanks to Baby Boomers wanting to stay active as long as possible.
  • Aging adults are being encouraged by their doctors to remain active by engaging in wellness programs and following recommended healthy living guidelines.

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, WebMD, National Institute on Aging

At Presbyterian Village North in Dallas, Texas, a faith-based non-profit assisted living community, Godwin Dixon, President and CEO, and Keith McCrate, Director of Rehabilitation, follow a focused path to effectively treat their 600 independent, assisted living and skilled nursing residents as well as outpatient community members.  One service that is truly making a difference in their community is aquatic therapy.

Using an Aquatic Therapy Pool to Address Medical Considerations

There are numerous conditions that the team at Presbyterian Village North treat with aquatic therapy. These include, but are not limited to, Alzheimer’s, dementia, knee replacement surgery, pelvic fractures, back fractures, COPD, osteoarthritis, stroke, orthopedic problems and Parkinson’s.

In order to ensure these residents and community members get the best care, the staff members put in place mechanisms to improve the likelihood of long-term success, such as:

  • Strong nursing programs that understand how to deal with residents with bowel and bladder issues.  In the therapy pool, incontinence in physical therapy patients must be addressed or rehab cannot take place.
  • The ability to get a wheelchair- or bed-bound resident into the water so rehabilitation can take place comfortably and safely.
  • The opportunity to use an underwater camera attached to an external TV to show immediate bio-feedback on gait, movement, hand placement and foot placement.
  • Trained personnel who understand how to creatively and effectively use the therapy pool to get the most out of each session for the patients.

When the right people are brought together with a high-end therapy pool, magic can happen for individuals who thought they could not progress because of physical or mental disabilities or setbacks.

A Day in the Life of the Presbyterian Village North Therapy Pool

A normal day for the team at Presbyterian Village North involves a great deal of activity. However this bustle, was not achieved overnight or by chance. It is the result of a number of factors, one largely being the effective day-to-day schedule and organized routine the team at Presbyterian Village North has in place.

They maintain a daily and weekly pool schedule that allots times for pool appointments.  When the physical therapists arrive onsite at 7 a.m., they immediately get their schedules, and then call patients to remind them to be at the pool or tell them when a staff member will pick them up to transport them to their aquatic therapy session.

As each patient comes for their appointment, he or she gets dressed in the appropriate underwater rehabilitation or fitness outfit, bathes and then proceeds to start the session. At the end of approximately 45 minutes in the water, the patient then showers again and dresses for their daily activities.

During the daily routine, the staff members, including the physical therapists and a full-time certified aquatic therapist who runs the program, may or may not be in the water.  Some physical therapists prefer to be in the pool with their patients while others feel more comfortable directing the residents’ movements from an out-of-pool position.

By the end of each weekday, about 12-16 patients have been seen. The patients are given priority by their connection to the organization.  Thus, residents get first priority before patients who are part of the surrounding community outside the campus. This means in a week’s time, up to 80 people who call Presbyterian Village North home have likely been touched by this piece of high-tech equipment.  It’s a rhythm that keeps the therapy pool in high use, and that brings stimulation, relaxation, fitness and enjoyment to everyone who has the opportunity to get in the pool.

Moving Forward, Changing Lives

Presbyterian Village North is dedicated to changing lives every day. With the tremendous growth they’ve seen since the therapy pool’s opening and implementation, as well as incredibly high patient satisfaction scores from 100 percent of the rehab patients they’ve served, they’re ready to tackle anything the future has to offer.

As Dixon says with a smile, he and his team “love being able to reference that this is the same pool that the Dallas Mavericks have. We may not be able to get your jump shot better, but we’ll get you walking again.”  He’s quick to note that many miracles have happened in the pool at the facility; no doubt many more will occur thanks to the dedication of every person who stands behind the Presbyterian Village North mission.

Watch the video below to hear from Dixon and McCrate on the impact that the therapy pool has had on their community:

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Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

2015 March 12
by hydroworx

KUphotocropAccording to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), low back pain is a very common problem in industrialized countries, affecting over 70 percent of the working population and it is also common in sports such as football, soccer, golf, rowing and gymnastics. Injuries to the lower back can be the result of improper conditioning and warm-up, repetitive loading patterns, excessive sudden loads and twisting activities. Proper body mechanics and flexibility are essential for all activities.

Join us on March 19, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT for the free webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS will discuss the value of aquatic therapy for treating low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis.

Strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium will also be discussed. These strategies will help to safely and effectively rehabilitate patients or athletes by challenging them with stability, strengthening and power exercises.

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

  • The anatomy of the low back
  • Most common injuries to low back
  • The properties of water that make it ideal for treating low back injuries
  • Specific rehabilitation exercises for low back injuries

Learn more and register here>>


Register Today



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Baseball Fever Strikes Again, and Aquatic Fitness Keeps Players in the Game

2015 March 10

Although the weather in the northeastern part of the United States, such as Middletown, PA-HydroWorx’s home base- hasn’t quite thawed yet, professional baseball players are back on the grass and turf for sunny spring training in the Phoenix, Arizona and Clearwater, Florida areas. As these athletes begin to get back in shape for another season of record breaking batting averages, nail-biter ninth innings and headline-making rivalries, their coaches and athletic trainers are all looking for ways to keep them as healthy as possible.  For many MLB teams, this includes getting players – both healthy and injured – into aquatic therapy pools.IMG_2097

Each team has its own “secret sauce” of aquatic-based cross-training programs and, when necessary, rehab-related regimens.  However, while we can’t say for certain which techniques are used on a daily basis, we do know what Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at University of Kansas recommends. Grant has worked with innumerable baseball players, both in Kansas and around the country, who all wanted to get an edge on their competition, reach their personal bests and recover from surgeries and injuries.

During a HydroWorx sponsored event, Grant demonstrated exercises, specific to baseball players, in the pool. Each exercise focuses on strength, agility, flexibility, speed and/or endurance.  Just a few of the prominent ones mentioned – and the reasons they work so well in the water – include:

  • Core-busting sets. Standing in the pool, an athlete can tighten and relax his abs up to 100 times as part of a core-building routine. He can also stand against the wall and do constant stomach pulls, essentially keeping the muscles of the abdomen engaged for long periods of time. Plus, those paddle boards or giant blow-up balls can be used to force a “mini-crunch” progression of controlled movement that blasts the abs. Grant’s quick to remind all athletes and coaches that the core is the foundation of the player; without strength in the gut, there’s a limit on how much the baseball athlete can do on the field.
  • Water resistance arm workouts. Grant isn’t talking about just flailing arms around; instead, a specific movement with the arms is performed repeatedly. This movement can be done with or without assistive devices such as HydroTone handheld bells.  Additional movements, such as swiveling at the waist, can be incorporated to attack other planes of motion.
  • Shoulder workouts.  Medicine balls aren’t just for land; they can be used in the pool with terrific physical responses.  As Grant explains, it’s even possible to “throw” a medicine ball in the water against the force of the resistance jets. The jets push the ball back, creating the opportunity for chest passes. Doing a few minutes of this type of intense exercise gets the blood pumping, the muscles moving and the shoulder joints lubed up for land play.
  • Injury recovery exercises.  Baseball players who have suffered injuries can get their bodies back into playing mode with exercises like one-handed submerging of water “buoys”.  These plastic items force the exerciser to push against the buoys’ natural tendency to want to float.  By working on multi-planar stabilization of the upper body, the player can comfortably engage injured areas without compromising healing. Additionally, if the injured body part is a hip, knee or foot, the pool can provide a safe environment in which to work a player’s range of motion with or without HydroTones, balls or even TRX bands.

There’s a whole host of other exercises that can make a difference during this year’s baseball season, such as underwater base pulley rows, kettle bell swings and rotations, and box jumps and lateral dips.  Oh, and don’t forget that when the underwater treadmill is brought into the picture, it’s possible for athletes to skip, run, bound, sprint and much more… all while getting the benefit of a warm water therapy pool atmosphere and the advantages of the aquatic environment’s hydrostatic pressure and other natural properties. From spring training in Phoenix to the World Series in Philadelphia, aquatic therapy will remain a crucial component of each team throughout the duration of the 2015 season.

Stay tuned as we keep you informed on the exciting progress that players are making throughout the months ahead.

Watch Murphy Grant’s full demonstration below:

 

Free Webinar: Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy

Join us on March 19, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT as Murphy Grant, MS, LAT, PES Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine and Head Football Athletic Trainer at The University of Kansas, presents the webinar, “Strategies for Treating Low Back Injuries with Aquatic Therapy.” This webinar will provide treatment ideas for using the benefits of hydrotherapy for low back injuries such as Lumbar Sprain, Muscular Strains, Contusions, Sciatica, Herniated Disks, Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis. The webinar will also offer strategies to develop rehabilitation programs and progressions using aquatic therapy as a medium.

Register Today>>

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Upcoming Webinar: “Pediatric Aquatic Therapy: Improving Outcomes by Integrating Play & Creativity”

2015 March 5

LegUpFarmCropLeg Up Farm is a non-profit therapy center in York County, Pennsylvania, for children with disabilities and developmental delays. They have seen some great results from using aquatic therapy along with some creativity with their pediatric clients.

Join us on March 12, 2015 from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EDT for the free webinar, “Pediatric Aquatic Therapy: Improving Outcomes by Integrating Play & Creativity.” Amy Arruda, DPT, ATRIC, Director of Aquatics at Leg Up Farm in York County, PA as she shares how aquatic therapy can be used effectively for pediatric physical therapy. She will review the benefits of water for this patient population and will share specific protocols that they use. Amy will also present cases seen at Leg Up Farm in which they’ve successfully used aquatic therapy to increase progress.

Attendees will learn:

  • Creative and fun ways to use the pool for the pediatric population
  • Specific aquatic protocols and techniques
  • How to customize programs tailored to individual needs of children
  • About the unique and innovative programs at Leg Up Farm

Learn more and register here>>


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